NATIVE AMERICAN LAW SECTION

State Bar of Texas

NATIVE AMERICAN LAW SECTION

State Bar of Texas

Welcome

The purpose of the Native American Law Section is to advocate the common professional interest of all those having an interest in Native American law in Texas. In addition, the section seeks to promote Native American issues on both public and private forums throughout the State of Texas.

Welcome

The purpose of the Native American Law Section is to advocate the common professional interest of all those having an interest in Native American law in Texas. In addition, the section seeks to promote Native American issues on both public and private forums throughout the State of Texas.

Native American Law Section Reports Icon

Learn more about news circulating the Native American Law Section and the people who support it.

Native American Law Section Conferences

Learn more about previous and any upcoming conferences for the Native American Law Section.

Native American Law Section Awards

See our previous award winners for the Tom Diamond Award of Excellence and the Lifetime Achievement Award.

Native American Law Section Reports Icon

Learn more about news circulating the Native American Law Section and the people who support it.

Native American Law Section Conferences

Learn more about previous and any upcoming conferences for the Native American Law Section.

Native American Law Section Awards

See our previous award winners for the Tom Diamond Award of Excellence and the Lifetime Achievement Award.

Dear Reader,

The need for discourse and education on Native American/American Indian law and legal issues is particularly pressing for this state, with its growing population of Native peoples. The most recent U.S. Census ranks Texas among the five most populous states for American Indian/Native American population. This includes members of the three federally recognized Indian Nations based in Texas: the Alabama-Coushatta, the Ysleta del Sur Pueblo (Tigua), and the Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas. There is also a growing urban population with tribal affiliations outside of Texas. Additionally, there are a number of Texas-based groups currently seeking tribal recognition from the federal government.

The Section holds regular educational programs and presentations that are designed to educate Texas attorneys and judges about Native American/American Indian law and legal issues in Texas and how those fit into a broader national perspective.

Please explore our site and consider joining the Section. Thank you for your interest in the Native American Law Section of the State Bar of Texas.

Yours truly,
Ray Torgerson, Chair

Dear Reader,

The need for discourse and education on Native American/American Indian law and legal issues is particularly pressing for this state, with its growing population of Native peoples. The most recent U.S. Census ranks Texas among the five most populous states for American Indian/Native American population. This includes members of the three federally recognized Indian Nations based in Texas: the Alabama-Coushatta, the Ysleta del Sur Pueblo (Tigua), and the Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas. There is also a growing urban population with tribal affiliations outside of Texas. Additionally, there are a number of Texas-based groups currently seeking tribal recognition from the federal government.

The Section holds regular educational programs and presentations that are designed to educate Texas attorneys and judges about Native American/American Indian law and legal issues in Texas and how those fit into a broader national perspective.

Please explore our site and consider joining the Section. Thank you for your interest in the Native American Law Section of the State Bar of Texas.

Yours truly,
Ray Torgerson, Chair

Close Menu